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SATA 2 (SATA II)

Definition - What is SATA 2.0?

SATA 2 (sometimes spelled SATA II or SATA 2.0) is a marketing term to describe products that use a revised version of the Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) standard. SATA defines the interface for the connection between the computer's motherboard and a hard drive, tape drive or other storage device. SATA 2 features include:

Hot plugging - the ability to remove and change a drive while the computer is running.

Staggered Spin Up - the ability to start disk drives in sequence, instead of all at once, to even out the power load when the system is first started. 

Native command queuing - improves the performance and efficiency of SATA drives. Normally commands will arrive at a disk to read or write from different locations on the disk. When commands are executed in the order they arrive, a great deal of mechanical overhead is created because the read/write head is constantly being repositioned. SATA II drives use an algorithm to determine the most efficient order to execute commands, reducing mechanical overhead and improving performance.

Port multipliers - allows up to 15 drives to be connected to a SATA controller with a port multiplier. Although this is far less than the number of drives that can be connected using Fibre Channel or Serial Attached SCSI (SAS), this improvement makes  it much easier to build disk enclosures using SATA drives.

Port selectors - allows two hosts to be connected to one drive. This is useful because it creates a redundant connection to the disk drive. This way, if one of the hosts has a failure, the second host can take over so access to storage is maintained. This type of redundancy is essential for enterprise environments.

 

Learn more:

What are the differences between SATA I and SATA II?

Learn more about SATA II features and how to leverage its capabilities.

To find out which hard drives use SATA 2.0, visit DesktopReview.com.

This was last updated in September 2011
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