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STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)

Contributor(s): Stan Gibilisco

STEM is an educational program developed to prepare primary and secondary students for college and graduate study in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). In addition to subject-specific learning, STEM aims to foster inquiring minds, logical reasoning, and collaboration skills. 

In the United States, the program helps immigrants with skills in the STEM subjects obtain work visas. In addition, STEM focuses on perceived education quality shortcomings in these fields, with the aim of increasing the supply of qualified high-tech workers.

Educators break STEM down into seven standards of practice (or skill sets) for educating science, technology, engineering, and mathematics students:

  • Learn and apply content
  • Integrate content
  • Interpret and communicate information
  • Engage in inquiry
  • Engage in logical reasoning
  • Collaborate as a team
  • Apply technology appropriately

 

This was last updated in April 2013

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What kind of technology do they mean in STEM?
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Any kind of tool that solves a problem; it could be a pencil, a ruler, a screw driver, or a computer.
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How is the current employment climate for STEM candidates?
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Love this website. Everyone uses it. It also comes in handy for my kids.
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How does one procure a list of Stem colleges in USA?
This is pertaining to MS in architecture courses with focus on parametrics.
Plus if one has done undergrad in UK(Diploma in AA school of architecture 5 year program RIBA part 2)how does one go about the conversion to see if one is eligible for MS in architecture?

Thank you


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