Browse Definitions :
Definition

Slackware

Slackware is the earliest distribution of the Linux operating system that is still (as of September 2007) being developed. Patrick Volkerding created Slackware from an even earlier distribution called Softlanding Linux. According to the Slackware project Web site, the OS was designed, in particular, for ease of use and stability.

Here's a description of the Slackware philosophy, from the project site:

Since its first release in April of 1993, the Slackware Linux Project has aimed at producing the most "UNIX-like" Linux distribution out there. Slackware complies with the published Linux standards, such as the Linux File System Standard. We have always considered simplicity and stability paramount, and as a result Slackware has become one of the most popular, stable, and friendly distributions available.

A full installation of Slackware includes (among other features):

  • the X Window System
  • C/C++ development environments
  • Perl
  • networking utilities
  • a mail server
  • a news server
  • a web server
  • an FTP server
  • the GNU Image Manipulation Program

Slackware's name is a reference to the concept of "slack" in the Church of the SubGenius, a largely Internet-based satirical pseudoreligion that had a cult following in the 1980s-90s. Within the Church, along with the common meaning of latitude, slack also implies personal space and freedom, independence, and the capacity for original thought. The developers of the Slackware operating system used the term to suggest that the project was, at least at its inception, a not-quite-serious spin-off project.

Slackware's mascot is a pipe-smoking version of Tux, the Linux penguin.

This was last updated in September 2010

Continue Reading About Slackware

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • threat modeling

    Threat modeling is a procedure for optimizing application, system or business process security by identifying objectives and ...

  • distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack

    A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is one in which multiple compromised computer systems attack a target, such as a ...

  • social engineering

    Social engineering is an attack vector that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves manipulating people into ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

SearchStorage
  • bare-metal cloud

    Bare-metal cloud is a public cloud service that offers dedicated hardware resources without any installed operating systems or ...

  • race condition

    A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at ...

  • storage security

    Storage security is the group of parameters and settings that make storage resources available to authorized users and trusted ...

Close