Browse Definitions :
Definition

Stanford Bunny

The Stanford Bunny is a computer graphics test model (GTM) for 3-D graphics. The Bunny is a data-set for constructing digital, three dimensional models. The original model for the Bunny was a clay rabbit figure. The data from the clay rabbit was collected by using a technique called range scan that was developed by Greg Turk of Georgia Institute of Technology and Marc Levoy of Stanford University. 

In a range scan, the color or shade of each pixel represents a specific radial distance, technically known as range, from the observer's point of view. Mathematically, the range scan of the original clay rabbit is a collection of 69,451 triangles. The paper version below is a simple illustration of how a programmer might use shade data from a range scan to re-create the bunny.

In a range scan, radial distances can be portrayed as colors of the spectrum in a red-green-blue ( RGB ) image or as levels of brightness in a grayscale image. In a color range scan, for example, the shortest ranges might be rendered as white, progressing through the colors of the spectrum according to decreasing wavelength -- red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet -- as the range increases, with maximum or infinite range represented as a black background. A grayscale range scan might portray the shortest ranges as white, with increasing ranges as progressively darker shades of gray until the background, at infinite range, is rendered as black. When a real-world three-dimensional ( 3D ) solid object is scanned in this way, the resulting image resembles a false-color or false-grayscale photograph.

See videos:
Stanford bunny: Linear elastic model
Stanford bunny: Neohookean elastic model

 

The Stanford Bunny is the oldest and best-known of a collection of models in the Stanford 3D Scanning Repository. Other models include a drill bit, an armadillo, an angel, a dragon and a Buddha.

This was last updated in April 2010

Continue Reading About Stanford Bunny

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

  • biometric verification

    Biometric verification is any means by which a person can be uniquely identified by evaluating one or more distinguishing ...

  • password

    A password is a string of characters used to verify the identity of a user during the authentication process.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close