Browse Definitions :
Definition

Thunderbolt

Contributor(s): Stan Gibilisco

Thunderbolt (code named "Light Peak") is a high-speed, bidirectional input/output (I/O) technology that can transfer data of all types on a single cable at speeds of up to 10 Gbps (billions of bits per second). A single cable up to three meters (10 feet) long can support seven devices simultaneously in a daisy chain.

According to Intel, a Thunderbolt connection can transfer 1 TB (terabyte) of data in less than five minutes and a typical high-definition (HD) video file in less than 30 seconds. The high speed and low latency make Thunderbolt ideal for backup, restore, and archiving operations. Of the seven devices (maximum) that a Thunderbolt connection can support at one time, two of them can be displays. Because of the exceptional transfer rate that Thunderbolt offers, the technology is ideal for gamers and video professionals.

The nickname "Light Peak" derives from Intel's original intent to use optical fiber cabling. However, engineers discovered that copper cables could provide up to 10 Gbps at a lower cost than optical fiber cables could do. In addition, Intel found that copper cabling could deliver up to 10 watts of power to attached devices at the requisite speeds.

This was last updated in February 2013

Continue Reading About Thunderbolt

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

SearchCompliance

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

  • PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

    The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a widely accepted set of policies and procedures intended to ...

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

SearchSecurity

  • tokenization

    Tokenization is the process of replacing sensitive data with unique identification symbols that retain all the essential ...

  • incident response

    Incident response is an organized approach to addressing and managing the aftermath of a security breach or cyberattack, also ...

  • Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA)

    The Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) is United States legislation that defines a framework of guidelines and ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

  • cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR)

    Cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR) is a combination of strategies and services intended to back up data, applications and other ...

SearchStorage

Close