Browse Definitions :
Definition

TrackPoint (pointing stick)

A TrackPoint, also called a pointing stick, is a cursor control device found in IBM ThinkPad notebook computer s. The device is sometimes called an eraser pointer because it is roughly the size and shape of a pencil eraser. It has a replaceable red tip (called a nipple) and is located in the middle of the keyboard between the G, H, and B keys. The control buttons are located in front of the keyboard toward the user.

The TrackPoint is operated by pushing in the general direction the user wants the cursor to move. Increasing pressure causes faster movement. The relation between pressure and cursor or pointer speed can be adjusted, in a manner similar to the way the mouse speed is adjusted in a traditional desktop computer. The TrackPoint system, originally introduced by IBM in 1992, has acquired a devoted following of people who prefer it to the older trackball and the more recent touch pad methods of cursor or pointer control in notebook computers.

The term TrackPoint can also refer to the pointing algorithm that translates mechanical pressure on the pointing device into instructions that move the cursor or pointer.

This was last updated in March 2011

Continue Reading About TrackPoint (pointing stick)

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

SearchCompliance

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

  • PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

    The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a widely accepted set of policies and procedures intended to ...

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

SearchSecurity

  • tokenization

    Tokenization is the process of replacing sensitive data with unique identification symbols that retain all the essential ...

  • incident response

    Incident response is an organized approach to addressing and managing the aftermath of a security breach or cyberattack, also ...

  • Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA)

    The Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) is United States legislation that defines a framework of guidelines and ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

  • cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR)

    Cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR) is a combination of strategies and services intended to back up data, applications and other ...

SearchStorage

Close