Browse Definitions :
Definition

URN (Uniform Resource Name)

A URN (Uniform Resource Name) is an Internet resource with a name that, unlike a URL, has persistent significance - that is, the owner of the URN can expect that someone else (or a program) will always be able to find the resource. A frequent problem in using the Web is that Web content is sometimes moved to a new site or a new page on the same site. Since links are made using Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), they no longer work when content is moved.

A URN looks something like a URL. For example, here's a hypothetical URN:

 urn:def://blue_laser

where "def://" might indicate an agency or an accessible directory of all dictionaries, glossaries, and encyclopedias on the Internet and "blue laser" was the name of a term. The result of using the agency could be the "best definition," the "longest definition," or even all definitions that the agency could find of "blue laser."

A comparable URL would need to specify one specific location for a definition such as:

 https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/blue-laser

In this case, the user has to know where the resource is located as well as how to spell the file name and suffix. With a URN, the user only needs to know the name of a resource. One or more agencies will presumably be able to locate the nearest copy of the resource and the user is freed from understanding where resources are located or relocated to.

Both URN and URL are types of a concept called the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). A URN is associated with another concept called Uniform Resource Characteristics (URC), which allows descriptive information to be associated with a URN, such as author, date, length, and so forth.

It is possible to have a name that includes an address so, in some cases, a URN may also be a URL...but it doesn't have to be.

The URN is still being developed by members of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

This was last updated in September 2005

Continue Reading About URN (Uniform Resource Name)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

  • biometric verification

    Biometric verification is any means by which a person can be uniquely identified by evaluating one or more distinguishing ...

  • password

    A password is a string of characters used to verify the identity of a user during the authentication process.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close