Browse Definitions :
Definition

USART (Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter)

A USART (Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter) is a microchip that facilitates communication through a computer's serial port using the RS-232C protocol.

Like a UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter), a USART provides the computer with the interface necessary for communication with modems and other serial devices. However, unlike a UART, a USART offers the option of synchronous mode. In program-to-program communication, the synchronous mode requires that each end of an exchange respond in turn without initiating a new communication. Asynchronous operation means that a process operates independently of other processes.

Practical differences between synchronous mode (which is possible only with a USART) and asynchronous mode (which is possible with either a UART or a USART) can be outlined as follows:

  • Synchronous mode requires both data and a clock. Asynchronous mode requires only data.
  • In synchronous mode, the data is transmitted at a fixed rate. In asynchronous mode, the data does not have to be transmitted at a fixed rate.
  • Synchronous data is normally transmitted in the form of blocks, while asynchronous data is normally transmitted one byte at a time.
  • Synchronous mode allows for a higher DTR (data transfer rate) than asynchronous mode does, if all other factors are held constant.

 

This was last updated in July 2012

Continue Reading About USART (Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

  • biometric verification

    Biometric verification is any means by which a person can be uniquely identified by evaluating one or more distinguishing ...

  • password

    A password is a string of characters used to verify the identity of a user during the authentication process.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close