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UXGA (Ultra Extended Graphics Array)

UXGA (Ultra Extended Graphics Array) is a display mode in which the resolution is 1600 pixels horizontally by 1200 pixels vertically (1600 x 1200). This amounts to a total of 1,920,000 pixels on the screen.

A UXGA display might be preferred by computer users who want or need fine detail. UXGA displays also allow the user to specify up to four 800 x 600-pixel images at a time, with reasonable detail in each. An example of such an application is the reception of a television (TV) program while browsing the Web, and at the same time working in a word processor and a vector graphics program. Scientists and engineers can make use of the high resolution and large screen size when working with computer-aided graphics (CAD) programs, especially three-dimensional (3D) rendering.

A UXGA display provides 6.25 times as many pixels as a 640 x 480 display, four times as many pixels as an 800 x 600 display, and approximately 2.44 times as many pixels as a 1024 x 768 display. Modest-sized liquid crystal display (LCD) panels with the UXGA specification offer a level of detail comparable to print on paper. The main disadvantage of this type of display is the high cost compared with displays having less resolution.

This was last updated in September 2005

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