Browse Definitions :
Definition

Verizon Communications v. Federal Communications Commission (2014)

Verizon Communications v. Federal Communications Commission was a 2014 case in which the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the FCC lacked the authority to regulate broadband providers as common carriers.

The 2014 ruling is considered a victory for internet service providers (ISPs) and a defeat for supporters of net neutrality, the principle that internet traffic should be transferred impartially, without regard to content, destination or source. Net neutrality supports the concept that internet service is a utility -- like gas, water, electricity and landline phone service -- and that, as such, it should be available to everyone and subject to government regulation.

The classification of common carrier defines infrastructure, similarly, as a public right of way. This means that all citizens should have equal service from any business that operates on it. Telecommunications services, such as telephone, are classified as common carriers under provisions of the Communications Act of 1934. The Verizon v. FFC decision vacated (struck down) two rules in the Commission's Open Internet Order of 2010 that were based on regulation of broadband as a common carrier:

No unreasonable discrimination: Providers may not unreasonably discriminate against users for lawful traffic.

No blocking: The principles of fair selection and use should be allowed so long as these choices do not break the law or negatively affect the performance of the network.

However, the court upheld the rule for transparency, mandating that service providers must clearly disclose network management practices, speeds and terms of use to consumers.

This was last updated in April 2017

Continue Reading About Verizon Communications v. Federal Communications Commission (2014)

SearchCompliance
  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity
  • session key

    A session key is an encryption and decryption key that is randomly generated to ensure the security of a communications session ...

  • data breach

    A data breach is a cyber attack in which sensitive, confidential or otherwise protected data has been accessed and/or disclosed ...

  • multifactor authentication (MFA)

    Multifactor authentication (MFA) is a security technology that requires more than one method of authentication from independent ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close