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Viber

Viber is a VoIP and instant messaging application with cross-platform capabilities that allows users to exchange audio and video calls, stickers, group chats, and instant voice and video messages. It Is a product of Rakuten Viber, a multinational internet company headquartered in Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Messages sent over Viber are protected with end-to-end encryption. The app is popular for users who want to hold public and private conversations, as well as play games with other users and access the service via desktop. Viber is compatible with voice assistants such as Google Assistant and Siri, as well as the contacts list in a user’s phone. Viber’s instant messaging includes features like the capacity to share photos, GIFs, stickers, videos and emoticons.

Connecting desktop and smartphone chat, Viber supports iOS, Android, Windows XP and up, Mac OS 10.7 and up, as well as Linux Fedora and Ubuntu. The software also enables switching calls and chats between mobile and desktop. Users who speak different languages can converse with real-time translation features. By tapping a block of text, the user can choose a language and instantly translate the text.

Viber supports extensions for capabilities that allow users to do more without leaving chat windows. Extensions exist for finding restaurants, performing searches and sharing music and video.

The chat program offers direct marketing to help businesses attract users with promotional opportunities like stickers, ads, communities and direct marketing messages. When customers are interested, transitioning from marketing to selling is enabled with e-commerce integration. Viber has over a billion users and supports over two million interactions every minute, according to the company.

Most of Viber’s features are free, with some exceptions including calls made to landlines, international calls, and calls made to cell phones that do not have the Viber app.

This was last updated in September 2018

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