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W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) describes itself as follows:

"The World Wide Web Consortium exists to realize the full potential of the Web.

The W3C is an industry consortium which seeks to promote standards for the evolution ofthe Web and interoperability between WWW products by producing specifications andreference software. Although W3C is funded by industrial members, it is vendor-neutral,and its products are freely available to all.

The Consortium is international; jointly hosted by the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science in theUnited States and in Europe by INRIA who provide both local support and performing coredevelopment. The W3C was initially established in collaboration with CERN, where the Web originated,and with support from DARPA and the European Commission."

Organizations may apply for membership to the Consortium; individual membership isn't offered. The W3C has taken over what was formerly called the CERN Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon or Web server.

This was last updated in March 2007

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