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Definition

Web 3.0

Web 3.0 is the third generation of internet services for websites and applications that will focus on using a machine-based understanding of data to provide a data-driven and Semantic Web. The ultimate goal of Web 3.0 is to create more intelligent, connected and open websites.

Web 3.0 has not yet been implemented, so there is no solid definition. It took over ten years to transition from the original web, Web 1.0, to Web 2.0, and it is expected to take just as long, if not longer, to fully implement and reshape the web with Web 3.0. However, the technologies that some people believe are going to make up and ultimately define Web 3.0 are currently being developed. Smart home appliances using wireless networks and the Internet of Things (IoT) are two examples of how Web 3.0 is already impacting technology.

If the trend of change is traced from Web 1.0, a static information provider where people read websites but rarely interacted with them, to Web 2.0, an interactive and social web enabling collaboration between users, then it can be assumed that Web 3.0 will change both how websites are made and how people interact with them.

Web 3.0 properties

Web 3.0 may be constructed with artificial intelligence (AI), semantic web and ubiquitous properties in mind.  The idea behind using AI comes from the goal of providing faster, more relevant data to end-users. A website using AI should be able to filter through and provide the data it thinks a specific user will find appropriate. Social bookmarking as a search engine can provide better results than Google since the results are websites that have been voted on by users. However, these results can also be manipulated by humans. AI could be used to separate the legitimate results from the falsified, therefore producing results similar to social bookmarking and social media, but without bad feedback.

An artificially intelligent web will also introduce virtual assistants, an element that is already emerging today as an aspect built into a device or through third party apps.

The idea behind the semantic web is to categorize and store information in a way that helps teach a system what specific data means. In other words, a website should be able to understand words put in search queries the same way a human would, enabling it to generate and share better content. This system will also use AI; semantic web will teach a computer what the data means and then AI will take the information and use it.

Ubiquitous computing refers to embedded processing in everyday objects, which enables the intercommunication of devices in a user’s environment. This is thought to be another property that Web 3.0 will have. The concept is similar to the Internet of Things.

The technologies which will make up these properties include microformats, data mining, natural language search and machine learning. Web 3.0 will also be more focused on peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies such as blockchain. Other technologies such as open APIs, data formats and open sourced software may also be used while developing Web 3.0 applications.

Web 3.0 and Web 2.0

Web 2.0 refers to websites and applications that utilize user-generated content for end users. Web 2.0 is used in many websites today, chiefly focusing on user interactivity and collaboration. Web 2.0 also focused on providing more universal network connectivity and communication channels. The difference between Web 2.0 and 3.0 is that Web 3.0 is more focused on the use of technologies like machine learning and AI to provide relevant content for each user instead of just the content other end users have provided.  Web 2.0 essentially allows users to contribute and sometimes collaborate on site content, while Web 3.0 will most likely turn these jobs over to the semantic web and AI technologies.

 

This was last updated in July 2019
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