Browse Definitions :
Definition

X Window System (X or XWindows)

Also see X (compact disc access time).

The X Window System (sometimes referred to as "X" or as "XWindows") is an open, cross-platform, client/server system for managing a windowed graphical user interface in a distributed network. In general, such systems are known as windowing systems. In X Window, the client-server relationship is reversed from the usual. Remote computers contain applications that make client requests for display management services in each PC or workstation. X Window is primarily used in networks of interconnected mainframes, minicomputers, and workstations. It is also used on the X terminal, which is essentially a workstation with display management capabilities but without its own applications. (The X terminal can be seen as a predecessor of the network PC or thin client computer.)

The X Window System was the result of research efforts in the early 1980s at Stanford University and MIT, aided by IBM, to develop a platform-independent graphics protocol. The X Window System is an open standard that is managed by the X.Org consortium. Although Microsoft has its own platform-dependent windowing system (an integral part of the Windows 95/98/NT operating systems), there are vendor-supplied X Windows products that can be installed to run on these systems.

This was last updated in September 2005
SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
  • encryption key

    In cryptography, an encryption key is a variable value that is applied using an algorithm to a string or block of unencrypted ...

  • payload (computing)

    In computing, a payload is the carrying capacity of a packet or other transmission data unit.

  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud NAS (cloud network attached storage)

    Cloud NAS (network attached storage) is remote storage that is accessed over the internet as if it is local.

  • object storage

    Object storage, also called object-based storage, is an approach to addressing and manipulating data storage as discrete units, ...

  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

Close