Browse Definitions :
Definition

XSD (XML Schema Definition)

XSD (XML Schema Definition) is a World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recommendation that specifies how to formally describe the elements in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) document. This description can be used to verify that each item of content in a document adheres to the description of the element in which the content is to be placed. XSD 1.1 became an approved W3C standard in April 2012.

XSD can also be used for generating XML documents that can be treated as programming objects. In addition, a variety of XML processing tools can also generate human readable documentation, which makes it easier to understand complex XML documents.

In general, a schema is an abstract representation of an object's characteristics and relationship to other objects. An XML schema represents the interrelationship between the attributes and elements of an XML object (for example, a document or a portion of a document). The process of creating a schema for a document involves analyzing its structure and defining each structural element encountered. For example, a schema for a document describing a website would define a website element, a webpage element, and other elements that describe possible content divisions within any page on that site. Just as in XML and HTML, elements are defined within a set of tags.

XSD has several advantages over earlier XML schema languages, such as Document Type Definition (DTD) or Simple Object XML (SOX). XSD is written in XML, which means that it doesn't require intermediary processing by a parser. Other benefits include self-documentation, automatic schema creation and the ability to be queried through XML Transformations (XSLT).

There are many challenges and limitations with XSD as well. Some detractors have argued it is unnecessarily complex, lacks a formal mathematical description and has limited support for unordered content.

This was last updated in May 2015

Continue Reading About XSD (XML Schema Definition)

SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • black hat hacker

    A black hat hacker has been historically used to describe one who has malicious intent -- such as theft of information, fraud or ...

  • cookie poisoning

    Cookie poisoning is a type of cyber attack in which a bad actor hijacks, forges, alters or manipulates a cookie to gain ...

  • footprinting

    Footprinting is an ethical hacking technique used to gather as much data as possible about a specific targeted computer system, ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

  • storage medium (storage media)

    In computers, a storage medium is a physical device that receives and retains electronic data for applications and users and ...

Close