Browse Definitions :
Definition

angular acceleration (rotational acceleration)

Angular acceleration, also called rotational acceleration, is a quantitative expression of the change in angular velocity that a spinning object undergoes per unit time. It is a vector quantity, consisting of a magnitude component and either of two defined directions or senses.

The magnitude, or length, of the angular acceleration vector is directly proportional to the rate of change of angular velocity, and is measured in radian s per second squared (rad/s 2 or rad · s -2 ). Alternatively, the angular acceleration magnitude can be expressed in degrees per second squared (deg/s 2 or deg · s -2 ). The direction of the angular acceleration vector is perpendicular to the plane in which the rotation takes place. If the increase in angular velocity appears clockwise with respect to an observer, then the angular acceleration vector points away from the observer. If the increase in angular velocity appears counterclockwise, then the angular acceleration vector points toward the observer.

The angular acceleration vector does not necessarily point in the same direction as the angular velocity vector. Consider a car rolling forward along a highway at increasing speed. The angular acceleration vectors for all four tires point toward the left along the lines containing the wheel axles. If the car stops accelerating and maintains a constant velocity, the angular acceleration vectors disappear. If the car slows down going forward, the vectors reverse their directions, and point toward the right along the lines containing the wheel axles. If the car is put into reverse and increases velocity going backwards, the angular acceleration vectors point toward the right along the lines containing the axles. If the backward velocity is constant, the angular acceleration vectors vanish; if the backward velocity decreases, the angular acceleration vectors point toward the left along the lines containing the wheel axles.

Also see acceleration , radian per second squared , and degree per second squared .

This was last updated in January 2011

Join the conversation

4 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

Can an observer inside a moving vehicle observe a change in direction of the vehicle given no outside reference and exclude forces acting on the observer?
Cancel
The answer given to my question is not answering my question; refer to my question before you answer, phew.
Cancel
me too thanks
Cancel
could u please attach related pitcure according to the explanation...
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

SearchSecurity

  • computer worm

    A computer worm is a type of malicious software program whose primary function is to infect other computers while remaining ...

  • Single Sign-On (SSO)

    Single sign-on (SSO) is a session and user authentication service that permits a user to use one set of login credentials (e.g., ...

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

    Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) is a certification issued by ISACA to people in charge of ensuring that an ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity plan (BCP)

    A business continuity plan (BCP) is a document that consists of the critical information an organization needs to continue ...

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

SearchStorage

Close