Browse Definitions :
Definition

Bootstrap

Bootstrap is a free and open source front end development framework for the creation of websites and web apps. The Bootstrap framework is built on HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (JS) to facilitate the development of responsive, mobile-first sites and apps.

Responsive design makes it possible for a web page or app to detect the visitor’s screen size and orientation and automatically adapt the display accordingly; the mobile first approach assumes that smartphonestablets and task-specific Mobile apps are employees' primary tools for getting work done and addresses the requirements of those technologies in design.

Bootstrap includes user interface components, layouts and JS tools along with the framework for implementation. The software is available precompiled or as source code.

Mark Otto and Jacob Thornton developed Bootstrap at Twitter as a means of improving the consistency of tools used on the site and reducing maintenance. The software was formerly known as Twitter Blueprint and is sometimes referred to as Twitter Bootstrap.

In computers, the word bootstrap means to boot: to load a program into a computer using a much smaller initial program to load in the desired program (which is usually an operating system).

In the physical world, a bootstrap is a small strap or loop at the back of a leather boot that enables you to pull the entire boot on and in general usage, bootstrapping is the leveraging of a small initial effort into something larger and more significant. There is also a common expression, "pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps," meaning to leverage yourself to success from a small beginning.

This was last updated in January 2017

Continue Reading About Bootstrap

SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • walled garden

    On the internet, a walled garden is an environment that controls the user's access to network-based content and services.

  • potentially unwanted program (PUP)

    A potentially unwanted program (PUP) is a program that may be unwanted, despite the possibility that users consented to download ...

  • plaintext

    In cryptography, plaintext is usually ordinary readable text before it is encrypted into ciphertext or after it is decrypted.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

  • storage medium (storage media)

    In computers, a storage medium is a physical device that receives and retains electronic data for applications and users and ...

Close