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calibration management software (CMS)

Calibration management software (CMS) is software designed to schedule the calibration of instrumentation and maintenance requirements in all types of industrial settings.

As one type of enterprise asset management software, CMS handles maintenance and repair operations. Industries that use calibration management software include oil and gas extraction and refining, pharmaceutical industries, power production facilities and food production facilities.

CMS uses a combination of scheduling, history and communication with field instrumentation to ensure that calibration, adjustments or replacements are performed on a timely basis to deal with vibration, expansion and contraction, and frictional wear. The software helps ensure that moving parts have lubricants and that consumable products used in a process are replaced in advance. Rather than waiting for things to run low or for problems to occur, CMS schedules maintenance for when it is optimal, wasting neither time nor resources. In addition, CMS tracks compliance with calibration timeliness and accuracy according to ISO standards and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations. CMS aids in error and cost reduction and improved organization and productivity.

The software can help mitigate high costs for maintenance and replacement of worn out parts. Waiting too long for maintenance or replacement can often result in  lost  product or reduced quality in a product line because an instrument was measured incorrectly. As a result, loosened tolerances can lead to extra maintenance costs, stoppages and even machine failures. On the other hand, overzealous repairs can lead to the unnecessary replacement of good parts and excessive adjustments, which increases the chance for human error. Because both too much and too little maintenance can cost money, a controlled approach using CMS can be more prudent.

This was last updated in May 2018

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