Browse Definitions :
Definition

can you hear me? (telephone voice signature scam)

Can you hear me is a telephone scam in which a perpetrator creates an audio recording of the victim saying the word "yes" by asking a question that will most likely be answered affirmatively. The affirmative response is then butt spliced to another audio file and used as a voice signature to authorize charges without the victim's knowledge.

A voice signature, also called a telephonic signature, is a type of electronic signature that can legally take the place of an ink signature in some situations. In a can you hear me scam, for example, the bogus affirmative answer may be used to authorize an additional telephone charge for monthly horoscopes that are never delivered. The perpetrator relies on the victim to pay bills on time and not notice an extra charge for $9.99 or other relatively small amount. With enough victims, the perpetrator can make a significant amount of money in a relatively short amount of time.

To avoid becoming the victim of a can you hear me or other voice signature scam, the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) offers mobile and landline phone customers the following advice:

  •     Hang up immediately if a call begins "Can you hear me?"
  •     Be suspicious of robocalls.
  •     When speaking to a unfamiliar caller, be alert for any question that prompts the answer "yes."
  •     Check bank, credit card and cell phone bill statements regularly for unauthorized charges.
  •     Ignore incoming phone calls from unfamiliar numbers.
  •     Do not return missed calls from unfamiliar numbers.
  •     Report suspicious calls to the Better Business Bureau and/or FTC hotlines.
  •     Consider joining the Do Not Call Registry.
This was last updated in February 2017

Continue Reading About can you hear me? (telephone voice signature scam)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • threat modeling

    Threat modeling is a procedure for optimizing application, system or business process security by identifying objectives and ...

  • distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack

    A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is one in which multiple compromised computer systems attack a target, such as a ...

  • social engineering

    Social engineering is an attack vector that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves manipulating people into ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

SearchStorage
  • bare-metal cloud

    Bare-metal cloud is a public cloud service that offers dedicated hardware resources without any installed operating systems or ...

  • race condition

    A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at ...

  • storage security

    Storage security is the group of parameters and settings that make storage resources available to authorized users and trusted ...

Close