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canary test (canary deployment)

In software testing, a canary is a push of programming code changes to a small group of end users who are unaware that they are receiving new code. Because the canary is only distributed to a small number of users, its impact is relatively small and changes can be reversed quickly should the new code prove to be buggy.

For incremental code changes, a canary approach to delivering functionality allows the development team to quickly evaluate whether or not the code release provides the desired outcome. Canary tests, which are often automated, are run after testing in a sandbox environment has been completed.

The word canary was selected to describe the code push to a subset of users because canaries were once used in coal mining to alert miners when toxic gases reached dangerous levels. Like the canary in a coal mine, the end user who is selected to receive new code in a canary test is unaware he or she is being used to provide an early warning.

In canary testing, a small subset of traffic serves as a test for updates. If anything in the update causes problems, it alerts the IT team before a large group of users feel the effects. In canary testing, a small subset of end users serves as a test group for code changes. If a change causes problems, monitoring software alerts the IT team so code can be fixed before it's released to a larger group of users.

This was last updated in November 2016

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