Browse Definitions :
Definition

chief reputation officer (CRO)

A chief reputation officer (CRO) is the C-level corporate executive charged with overseeing activities in all areas of an organization that could potentially have an impact on the public perception of that enterprise. 

Through reputation management efforts, the CRO attempts to shape perception of the organization by monitoring and influencing the publicly-available information about it. However, the essential mission of the CRO is ensuring that all activities, interactions and communications of the organization and employees acting on behalf of it are in alignment with the company's core values and corporate vision. 

The CRO typically reports to the CEO (chief executive officer) and works closely with corporate departments involved in public relations, human resources, marketing and social media. In some cases, the same individual will act in multiple capacities, serving as both CRO and chief marketing officer (CMO), chief strategy officer (CSO) or chief risk officer (CRO), among other possibilities. 

However, there are good reasons to make chief reputation officer a dedicated position. For one thing, the comprehensive authority and accountability of the CRO position make its demands substantial. Furthermore, the increasing emphasis on corporate ethics and transparency make their oversight crucial to business sustainability

See a video about creating trust in your company and managing your reputation:

This was last updated in January 2015

Continue Reading About chief reputation officer (CRO)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

  • biometric verification

    Biometric verification is any means by which a person can be uniquely identified by evaluating one or more distinguishing ...

  • password

    A password is a string of characters used to verify the identity of a user during the authentication process.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close