Browse Definitions :
Definition

click and collect

Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore

Click and collect is a hybrid e-commerce model in which people purchase or select items online and pick them up in-store or at a centralized collection point. The hybrid model is designed to streamline the processes involved in making in-store purchases and payments.

Click and collect can save a significant amount of time when a customer is purchasing a lot of items. The model is becoming increasingly available -- and popular -- in supermarkets. Typically, the shopper selects the items online and specifies a convenient pick-up time slot. A personal shopper selects the items at an appropriate time and the customer picks them up curbside.

For larger or more expensive items, centralized collection points can make delivery to more locations possible by serving geographic areas at some distance from the retail facilities. It may be feasible, for example, to deliver multiple orders to a collection center serving a given area periodically when delivery to individual customers would be too expensive.

Click and collect is among the changes to the retail landscape attributed to the ongoing trend to e-commerce sometimes referred to as the Amazon effect. Another manifestation of that trend is an attempt on the part of retailers to make in-person shopping more compelling to consumers through efforts like proximity marketing.

The click and collect model will undoubtedly evolve over time. As more and more human labor is automated, it's likely that the personal shoppers will be replaced by robots. (See: robot economy) The professional services firm Deloitte predicts that by 2020, physical stores will exist only as showrooms for a retailer’s products, to help consumers with the research phase of the purchase journey.

This was last updated in June 2017

Continue Reading About click and collect

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

SearchCompliance

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract, also known as a cryptocontract, is a computer program that directly controls the transfer of digital currencies...

  • risk map (risk heat map)

    A risk map, also known as a risk heat map, is a data visualization tool for communicating specific risks an organization faces. A...

SearchSecurity

  • challenge-response authentication

    In information security, challenge-response authentication is a type of authentication protocol where one entity presents a ...

  • Secure Shell (SSH)

    SSH, also known as Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell, is a network protocol that gives users, particularly system ...

  • honeypot (computing)

    A honeypot is a network-attached system set up as a decoy to lure cyberattackers and to detect, deflect or study hacking attempts...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • virtual disaster recovery

    Virtual disaster recovery is a type of DR that typically involves replication and allows a user to fail over to virtualized ...

  • tabletop exercise (TTX)

    A tabletop exercise (TTX) is a disaster preparedness activity that takes participants through the process of dealing with a ...

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a data center.

SearchStorage

  • exbibyte (EiB)

    An exbibyte (EiB) is a unit used to measure data capacity.

  • zebibyte (ZiB)

    A zebibyte (ZiB) is a unit used to measure computing and storage capacity.

  • tiered storage

    Tiered storage is a way to assign different categories of data to various types of storage media with the objective of reducing ...

Close