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Definition

click tracking

Contributor(s): Laura Fitzgibbons

Click tracking is a method used by companies to observe and analyze how many viewers visit a website, and digest its content, over a specific period of time. In addition to tracking the sheer amount of traffic and time spent on each page, companies can analyze how the visitors interact with their site. Every time a user clicks onto a webpage or piece of content with their mouse, the action is logged by the client using the click tracking technique. As the user continues to browse, these signals are gathered for further analysis.

Clicks can also be referred to as events, or actions that take place as a result of a click. Events can range from initiating a pop-up window, interacting with multimedia elements, downloading or printing a file and logging into an account.

This method can generate insights useful to sales and marketing staff to measure the effectiveness of a particular message or campaign, better understand the target audience and test user experience.

Examples of click tracking

It is possible to track whether a visitor to a site interacts with different kinds of content. Some examples include the following:

  • Buttons, tabs, scroll bars and pull-down menus are pressed.
  • External links are copied, hovered over or opened.
  • When online forms are started, abandoned, completed or submitted.
  • A video is started, stopped, replayed or paused.
  • A visitor begins a podcast and how far into the episode they listen.
  • Gadgets and widgets are hovered over or interacted with.
  • An image is clicked on, opened or saved.
  • The movement of the mouse is recorded over the period of time the visitor is on the webpage.
This was last updated in October 2018

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How can the granular level of click tracking detail available be used to improve a website for its visitors?
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