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clinical data analyst

A clinical data analyst is a healthcare information professional who verifies the validity of scientific experiments and gathered data from research. The purpose of these data analytics is to verify that processes and protocols are followed, improving the quality and efficiency of care. Clinical data analysts serve as the human element in clinical business intelligence.

Clinical data analysts interface between research teams, care staff and management. Analysts also report the results of clinical business intelligence to management, stakeholders and other interested parties.

The role of a clinical data analyst can include:

  • Validating results and conclusions from experiments and data from research for use in clinical business intelligence systems.
  • Training staff on the use of software programs.
  • Overseeing data management activities, both external and internal.
  • Implementing study-specific procedures to ensure compliance with existing regulations and procedures.
  • Designing, deploying and testing data collection systems.

Because of the medical nature of the work, it is generally recommended that clinical data analysts have two years of medical experience, preferably working with data. A bachelor’s degree in healthcare, computer science, biology, chemistry or another healthcare-related field of study is all that is required for entry-level positions. However, a master’s degree is usually preferred by employers and may lead to better offers for applicants with less experience. In the United States and Canada, candidates can also benefit from voluntary certification from the Canadian or American Health Information Management Associations, further demonstrating verified skills, knowledge and commitment.

This was last updated in June 2017

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