Browse Definitions :
Definition

coexistence testing

Coexistence testing, similar to compatibility testing, is a method of measuring the ability of multiple devices to interact in a single environment with limited bandwidth. As the number of interconnected devices over radio frequency (RF) increases, coexistence refers to ensuring one user's wireless device will not impact another wireless device. Impacts can range from loss of function to corrupted data to interrupted signal.

The first step of coexistence testing is to define the intended environment that the device is most likely to operate under, such as a professional, healthcare or home setting. Next, the primary functions, associated wireless protocols and necessary radio frequency (RF) bands need to be determined. Testing begins by modeling the intended environment and introducing interferences to see how the device and signals react using a spectrum analyzer. Types of setup for coexistence testing include mimicking a realistic wireless open environment or conducting radio frequency over direct coaxial cable connection.

During coexistence testing, devices are categorized based on four risk-based tiers:

  1. Major risks associated with the failure of coexistence.
  2. Moderate risks, such as delayed or disrupted service, associated with device coexistence.
  3. Minor risk, such as inconvenience, associated with device coexistence.
  4. Negligible risk where no further testing is needed.

Depending on the device and the returned risk tier, product redesign may need to take place prior to release. Risk management standards require wireless technology to be assessed in relationship to external, potentially hazardous factors. Coexistence of devices can be improved through multiple techniques, such as physical separation, frequency allocation, improved security mechanisms and transmission variation.

The most extreme reason to perform coexistence testing comes from the medical field. As more medical devices are integrating smart technology and being used outside of clinical environments, it is important that their critical functionality is not interrupted. There have been recorded instances of cell phones causing infusion pumps to stop or pacemakers being controlled by unauthorized sources. Manufacturers must test that devices can perform when introduced to external devices or interferences to address concerns of safety, reliability and mortality.

Uses

Coexistence testing can be applied to a wide range of use cases, all varying in severity.

  • Ensuring that medical devices peacefully interact with other medical devices in a clinical or commercial environment.
  • Testing website functionality across a range of browsers and devices.
  • Running applications on a range of operating systems (OS) and versions.
  • Analyzing compatibility or integration of various software.
  • Examining that IoT devices or smart home configurations perform independently over one network.
This was last updated in December 2018

Continue Reading About coexistence testing

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • private key

    A private key, also known as a secret key, is a variable in cryptography that is used with an algorithm to encrypt and decrypt ...

  • DOS (disk operating system)

    A DOS, or disk operating system, is an operating system that runs from a disk drive. The term can also refer to a particular ...

  • security token

    A security token is a physical or digital device that provides two-factor authentication for a user to prove their identity in a ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

Close