Browse Definitions :
Definition

commodity hardware

Commodity hardware, in an IT context, is a device or device component that is relatively inexpensive, widely available and more or less interchangeable with other hardware of its type.

To be interchangeable, commodity hardware is usually broadly compatible and can function on a plug and play basis with other commodity hardware products. In this context, a commodity item is a low-end but functional product without distinctive features.  A commodity computer, for example, is a standard-issue PC that has no outstanding features and is widely available for purchase. 

Other examples of commodity hardware in IT:

  • RAID (redundant array of independent -- originally inexpensive -- disks) performance typically relies upon an array of commodity hard disks to enable improvements in mean time between failures (MTBF), fault tolerance and failover.
  • A commodity server is a commodity computer that is dedicated to running server programs and carrying out associated tasks. In many environments, multiple low-end servers share the workload. Commodity servers are often considered disposable and, as such, are replaced rather than repaired.

Generally, commodity hardware can arise from any technologically mature product in a mature market. That means that most hardware products that have been around for a long time are available in commodity versions, although they aren't generally marketed as such. 

This was last updated in September 2013

Continue Reading About commodity hardware

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • security token

    A security token is a physical or digital device that provides two-factor authentication for a user to prove their identity in a ...

  • hardware security module (HSM)

    A hardware security module (HSM) is a physical device that provides extra security for sensitive data.

  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close