Browse Definitions :
Definition

confusion matrix

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

A confusion matrix is a table that outlines different predictions and test results and contrasts them with real-world values. Confusion matrices are used in statistics, data mining, machine learning models and other artificial intelligence (AI) applications. A confusion matrix can also be called an error matrix.

Confusion matrices are used to make the in-depth analysis of statistical data faster and the results easier to read through clear data visualization. The tables can help analyze faults in statistics, data mining, forensics and medical tests. A thorough analysis helps users decide what results indicate how errors are made rather than merely assessing performance.

Confusion matrices use a simple format to log predictions. In the rows of a confusion matrix for a machine learning model, the possible predictions are aligned on the right-hand side and the actualities along the top. In the rows underneath the actualities, predictions or results are recorded. Results can include the correct indication of a positive as a true positive or a negative as a true negative, as well as an incorrect positive as a false positive or an incorrect negative as a false negative.

Below is a simple example of a confusion matrix that might be used to outline pregnancy test results:

Color coding matrices provide the ability to quickly read a number of instances in a test. Quick visualization makes it possible to analyze a given model’s performance more deeply than a score and to identify trends that might aid in tweaking parameters.

This was last updated in April 2018

Continue Reading About confusion matrix

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • reverse brute-force attack

    A reverse brute-force attack is a type of brute-force attack in which an attacker uses a common password against multiple ...

  • orphan account

    An orphan account, also referred to as an orphaned account, is a user account that can provide access to corporate systems, ...

  • voice squatting (skill squatting)

    Voice squatting is an attack vector for voice user interfaces (VUIs) that exploits homonyms (words that sound the same but are ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity policy

    Business continuity policy is the set of standards and guidelines an organization enforces to ensure resilience and proper risk ...

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

SearchStorage

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • primary storage (main storage)

    Primary storage is the collective methods and technologies used to capture and retain digital information that is in active use ...

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access ...

Close