Browse Definitions :
Definition

corporate culture model

A corporate culture model is the organizing principle behind the values, beliefs and attitudes that characterize a company and guide its practices. Corporate cultures are often categorized by the degree of emphasis placed on various defining elements such as hierarchy, process, innovation, collaboration, competition, community involvement and social engagement. 

To some extent, a company's culture model, if not articulated outright, may be categorized by details contained in the company's mission statement or vision statement. Small and mid-size companies with relatively flat hierarchies may apply the principles of more than one model, or change emphasize for which model to value most, depending on business needs. Larger companies with deep hierarchies may find it more difficult to institute wide-spread changes in company culture and may, instead, seek to implement cultural changes at the division level.  

Popular corporate culture models include: 

Adhocracy - values the ability of the company to adapt quickly to changing conditions. Adhocracies are characterized by flexibility, employee empowerment and an emphasis on individual initiative. Although corporate levels exist in an adhocracy, they are less strictly defined than in more hierarchical environments. 

Clan culture - embraces a family-like or tribe-like environment that values consensus and commonality of values and goals.  This type of culture often puts mentoring programs in place to foster employee engagement and loyalty.

Hierarchical - has a fairly rigid and fixed organizational structure. Hierarchical cultures depend upon structure, rules and top-down control to guide business practices and activities. An adherence to identified best practices, controlled processes and considerable oversight are considered essential to productivity and success. 

Holacracy - has a flat management structure that distributes authority. The goal of a holacracy is to ensure that those responsible for completing work are given the authority to decide how that work should be carried out.

Keiretsu - extends the corporate culture to include partners. In Japanese, the word keiretsu means “group.” In a company that embraces keiretsu as a culture, each member of the group -- including those with independent financial interests -- works closely with other members of the group to ensure each other’s success. 

market culture - emphasizes competitiveness not only between the organization and its market competitors but also between employees. An emphasis on individual performance is thought to lead to greater achievement for the individual employee and, as a result, greater success for the organization. 

Startup culture - values creative problem solving, open communication and a flat hierarchy. Startup cultures may also be referred to as innovation cultures. Workplaces that foster a culture of innovation generally subscribe to the belief that innovation is not the province of top leadership but can come from anyone in the organization.

Developed by professor and change management researcher Robert Quinn, the Competing Values Framework offers a visual representation of four different management and culture models, visible in the following image:

This was last updated in January 2018

Continue Reading About corporate culture model

SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)

    Pretty Good Privacy or PGP was a popular program used to encrypt and decrypt email over the internet, as well as authenticate ...

  • email security

    Email security is the process of ensuring the availability, integrity and authenticity of email communications by protecting ...

  • cyberterrorism

    Cyberterrorism is often defined as any premeditated, politically motivated attack against information systems, programs and data ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • direct access

    In computer storage, direct access is the process of reading and writing data on a storage device by going directly to where the ...

  • kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi and exbi

    Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi and exbi are binary prefix multipliers that, in 1998, were approved as a standard by the ...

  • holographic storage (holostorage)

    Holographic storage is computer storage that uses laser beams to store computer-generated data in three dimensions.

Close