Browse Definitions :
Definition

cross-media ownership

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

Media cross-ownership is a situation in which a single corporate entity owns multiple types of media companies. The types of media companies owned may include print, radio, television, movie and internet media sites.

Owning multiple types of media companies allows a single corporation to build cross-linked walled gardens that corral customers and their money to the corporation’s child companies and create an environment of controlled messages. In the United States as of 1985, 90 percent of all media companies were owned by 50 different companies. Through acquisitions of smaller companies by larger ones, 90 percent of media companies are now concentrated under the ownership of just five corporations: Comcast, Time Warner, The Walt Disney Company, News Corp and National Amusements.

Freedom of speech advocates point out that cross-ownership affords massive control of public opinion. Cross-ownership of media can also be anti-competitive, fostering monopolies and slowing innovation by crushing startup competition. Due to these concerns, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reviews rules for media cross-ownership once every four years.

In 2015, the FCC ruled to keep current media cross-ownership rules. Media companies are still prohibited from owning TV, newspaper and/or radio stations within the same market, to the great upset of media giants. The sole exception to the rule is the concession that local media companies may step in to save failing local newspapers. However, media companies claim that action would prove to be too little, too late.

This was last updated in April 2017

Continue Reading About cross-media ownership

Join the conversation

1 comment

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

Why is cross-media ownership such a problem?
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

SearchCompliance

  • PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

    The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a widely accepted set of policies and procedures intended to ...

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

  • compliance framework

    A compliance framework is a structured set of guidelines that details an organization's processes for maintaining accordance with...

SearchSecurity

  • DNS over HTTPS (DoH)

    DNS over HTTPS (DoH) is a relatively new protocol that encrypts domain name system traffic by passing DNS queries through a ...

  • integrated risk management (IRM)

    Integrated risk management (IRM) is an approach to risk management that uses a set of practices and processes to improve an ...

  • MITRE ATT&CK framework

    The MITRE ATT&CK (pronounced 'miter attack') framework is a free, globally accessible service that provides comprehensive and ...

SearchHealthIT

  • telemedicine (telehealth)

    Telemedicine is the remote delivery of healthcare services, such as health assessments or consultations, over the ...

  • Project Nightingale

    Project Nightingale is a controversial partnership between Google and Ascension, the second largest health system in the United ...

  • medical practice management (MPM) software

    Medical practice management (MPM) software is a collection of computerized services used by healthcare professionals and ...

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchStorage

  • M.2 SSD

    An M.2 SSD is a solid-state drive (SSD) that conforms to a computer industry specification and is used in internally mounted ...

  • kilobyte (KB or Kbyte)

    A kilobyte (KB or Kbyte) is a unit of measurement for computer memory or data storage used by mathematics and computer science ...

  • virtual memory

    Virtual memory is a memory management capability of an operating system (OS) that uses hardware and software to allow a computer ...

Close