Browse Definitions :
Definition

cryptojacking

Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore

Cryptojacking is the surreptitious and unauthorized use of a computer for the resource and power-demanding requirements of cryptocurrency mining. The attack essentially creates a cryptomining bot, and the attacker may coopt many systems to create a botnet.

Hackers can use a variety of techniques for cryptojacking. Originally, cryptojacking involved infecting a target system with malware. More recently, however, in a common JavaScript-based method, the attacker creates content that automatically runs cryptomining software in users' browsers when they visit the page hosting it. The attacker may create the content for the purpose of cryptojacking or may compromise an existing site.

In another twist on the practice, researchers for Chinese cybersecurity vendor Qihoo 360's Netlab team recently reported that an ad network was running cryptomining software in the browsers of unsuspecting users who visit the advertisers' websites. Because programmatic advertising places ads automatically, site owners have little control over the issue. The malware used domain generation algorithms (DGAs) to bypass ad blockers and serve ads to all site visitors.

Cryptojacking techniques have been proposed for beneficial uses as well, such as providing a revenue stream for sites and services or crowdfunding for disaster relief efforts. Nevertheless, from the perspective of end users and network administrators, cryptojacking is primarily a drain on processing and power resources.

This was last updated in March 2018

Continue Reading About cryptojacking

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • orphan account

    An orphan account, also referred to as an orphaned account, is a user account that can provide access to corporate systems, ...

  • voice squatting (skill squatting)

    Voice squatting is an attack vector for voice user interfaces (VUIs) that exploits homonyms (words that sound the same but are ...

  • WPA3

    WPA3, also known as Wi-Fi Protected Access 3, is the third version of the security certification program developed by the Wi-Fi ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity policy

    Business continuity policy is the set of standards and guidelines an organization enforces to ensure resilience and proper risk ...

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

SearchStorage

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access ...

  • disk array

    A disk array, also called a storage array, is a data storage system used for block-based storage, file-based storage or object ...

  • enterprise storage

    Enterprise storage is a centralized repository for business information that provides common data management, protection and data...

Close