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digital evidence presentation system (DEPS)

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

A digital evidence presentation system (DEPS) is a system with an overhead camera and a liquid crystal display (LCD) used in law courts to present and record evidence digitally. A DEPS allows all individuals involved in a court decision to get a clear look at the presented evidence, hear audio and view multimedia content.

Generally, a DEPS is made up of an evidence table, an overhead camera, lighting, a touch screen display, built-in speakers and multiple audio/video outputs. DEPS can be portable or built into court stands. Outputs can connect to displays in the jury or court public announcement systems or optionally display in the witness’ and judge’s boxes. The systems make it possible to annotate evidence live on-screen through touch input. Most DEPS cameras have at least a 10X optical zoom and a further 4X digital zoom, allowing for image reduction down onto an area the size of a postage stamp. Recording systems are built in, although some may not record annotations. Many DEPS can be used to teleconference in outside parties. 

Though the systems are standard in many court rooms, attorneys must ask the court’s permission to use them in advance.

This was last updated in August 2017

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