Browse Definitions :
Definition

discrete event simulation (DES)

Discrete event simulation (DES) is the process of codifying the behavior of a complex system as an ordered sequence of well-defined events. In this context, an event comprises a specific change in the system's state at a specific point in time.

Common applications of DES include stress testing, evaluating potential financial investments, and modeling procedures and processes in various industries, such as manufacturing and healthcare.  

As an example of a situation that lends itself to DES, consider the amount of electrical power consumed by a corporation's office building as a function of time. Discrete events affecting this function include power-up or power-down of any electrical device in the building. Instantaneous changes of state in a device already powered-up are also discrete events; for example, a speed change in a cooling fan or a brightness change in a desk lamp. 

An effective DES process must include, at a minimum, the following characteristics:

  • Predetermined starting and ending points, which can be discrete events or instants in time.
  • A method of keeping track of the time that has elapsed since the process began.
  • A list of discrete events that have occurred since the process began.
  • A list of discrete events pending or expected (if such events are known) until the process is expected to end.
  • A graphical, statistical, or tabular record of the function for which DES is currently engaged.

DES is commonly used to monitor and predict the behavior of investments; the stock market is a classic example. DES can also help administrators predict how a network will behave under extraordinary conditions, such as the Internet during a major disaster.

This was last updated in July 2012

Continue Reading About discrete event simulation (DES)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • security token

    A security token is a physical or digital device that provides two-factor authentication for a user to prove their identity in a ...

  • hardware security module (HSM)

    A hardware security module (HSM) is a physical device that provides extra security for sensitive data.

  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process attempts to write more data to a fixed-length block of memory, or buffer, than...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close