Browse Definitions :
Definition

disposable computer

A disposable computer is a small data processing device with input/output , memory , and communication capabilities; the device is intended to be used for a limited time period or number of uses and then discarded. Cypak AB, a Swedish company, produces disposable computers and sells them to OEM s (original equipment manufacturers) for about $1 (U.S.) each. The Cypak device, essentially a processor mounted on paperboard, is currently being embedded in packing materials and used, for example, to track delivery data in courier packaging and to monitor patient dosage data from within the packaging for medications. Cypak's disposable computer has 32 kilobyte s of memory, which is enough to allow it to process and exchange several pages of encrypted data; it communicates through RFID .

As the price of embedded system s decreases, their cost becomes a less significant portion of the total cost of production, making the devices practical for a wider range of applications. According to some embedded systems engineers, disposable networked computers could soon be embedded in almost anything in our environment, leading to an envisioned future situation sometimes called ubiquitous computing .

A disposable computer is not necessarily the same thing as a disposable PC , which is a relatively inexpensive but full-featured personal computer that is designed to be discarded rather than fixed when serious problems arise.

This was last updated in September 2005

Continue Reading About disposable computer

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

    The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a widely accepted set of policies and procedures intended to ...

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

  • compliance framework

    A compliance framework is a structured set of guidelines that details an organization's processes for maintaining accordance with...

SearchSecurity

  • Trojan horse (computing)

    In computing, a Trojan horse is a program downloaded and installed on a computer that appears harmless, but is, in fact, ...

  • identity theft

    Identity theft, also known as identity fraud, is a crime in which an imposter obtains key pieces of personally identifiable ...

  • DNS over HTTPS (DoH)

    DNS over HTTPS (DoH) is a relatively new protocol that encrypts domain name system traffic by passing DNS queries through a ...

SearchHealthIT

  • telemedicine (telehealth)

    Telemedicine is the remote delivery of healthcare services, such as health assessments or consultations, over the ...

  • Project Nightingale

    Project Nightingale is a controversial partnership between Google and Ascension, the second largest health system in the United ...

  • medical practice management (MPM) software

    Medical practice management (MPM) software is a collection of computerized services used by healthcare professionals and ...

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchStorage

  • M.2 SSD

    An M.2 SSD is a solid-state drive (SSD) that conforms to a computer industry specification and is used in internally mounted ...

  • kilobyte (KB or Kbyte)

    A kilobyte (KB or Kbyte) is a unit of measurement for computer memory or data storage used by mathematics and computer science ...

  • virtual memory

    Virtual memory is a memory management capability of an operating system (OS) that uses hardware and software to allow a computer ...

Close