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docking station

A docking station is a hardware frame and set of electrical connection interfaces that enable a notebook computer to effectively serve as a desktop computer . The interfaces typically allow the notebook to communicate with a local printer, larger storage or backup drives, and possibly other devices that are not usually taken along with a notebook computer. A docking station can also include a network interface card ( NIC ) that attaches the notebook to a local area network ( LAN ).

Variations include the port replicator , an attachment on a notebook computer that expands the number of ports it can use, and the expansion base , which might hold a CD-ROM drive, a floppy disk drive, and additional storage.

This was last updated in October 2005

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I purchased a dual monitor stand and two flat screen monitors to hook up to my lap top for my he office. Is a docking station needed to move from one monitor to the next
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Can I connect my optical drive to my docking station instead of directly to my windows 10 laptop?
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does the docking station allow you to transfer the data from the laptop to the computer ?

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