Browse Definitions :
Definition

document sanitization

Document sanitization is the process of ensuring that only the intended information can be accessed from a document.

In addition to making sure the document text doesn’t openly divulge anything it shouldn’t, document sanitization includes removing document metadata that could pose a privacy or security risk. Document metadata can contain the names of authors and modifiers, the dates of creation and changes, file size, edit changes, revision histories and comment exchanges between authors and editors. Because that metadata may contain sensitive information, it's important safeguard it from unauthorized access. 

A common way to remove metadata from a document is to convert it to PDF format before releasing it; however, there are processes that must be followed to ensure the document contains no unintended information.  The National Security Agency (NSA) recommends the following six-step process for secure conversion and redaction of Word documents:

  1. Create a copy of the original document.
  2. Turn off “Track Changes” on the copy and remove all visible comments.
  3. Delete any sensitive information from the document that you wish to redact.
  4. Use the Microsoft Office Document Inspector to check for any unwanted metadata.
  5. Save the new document and convert it to a PDF file.
  6. Use the Sanitize Document tool in Acrobat Professional as a second check before releasing the redacted PDF.

See also: metadata management, metadata security

This was last updated in August 2014

Continue Reading About document sanitization

SearchCompliance

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

SearchSecurity

  • honeypot (computing)

    A honeypot is a network-attached system set up as a decoy to lure cyber attackers and detect, deflect and study hacking attempts ...

  • spam trap

    A spam trap is an email address that is used to identify and monitor spam email.

  • cracker

    A cracker is someone who breaks into someone else's computer system, often on a network; bypasses passwords or licenses in ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

  • erasure coding

    Erasure coding (EC) is a method of data protection in which data is broken into fragments, expanded and encoded with redundant ...

  • continuous data protection

    Continuous data protection (CDP), also known as continuous backup, is a backup and recovery storage system in which all the data ...

Close