Browse Definitions :
Definition

domain specific language (DSL)

A domain specific language (DSL) is a programming language that is developed to meet a specific need.  In this sense, a domain is a narrow area of interest.

A DSL may be developed to meet the needs of a particular platform, system, toolset, software problem, industry, or business challenge that cannot be effectively addressed by using mainstream languages. Examples of commonly used DSLs include cascading style sheets (CSS), Ant and SQL. The human-readable code that many DSLs employ can also help improve collaboration between programmers and other stakeholders. 

A DSL can be contrasted with a general purpose language, such as C#, which is designed to address a broad range of needs across the software development landscape. In many cases, a subset of a general purpose language can be developed and implemented as a domain specific language to address a particular problem. Ruby (particularly Ruby on Rails) and Scala are examples of languages that lend themselves to the development of these internal DSLs. For example, Scala might be used to create a DSL for highly complex domains such as trading exchanges in the energy industry. Most software projects will incorporate a general language and several peripheral DSLs to add required functionality for various domains within the system.

 

This was last updated in September 2014

Continue Reading About domain specific language (DSL)

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk avoidance

    Risk avoidance is the elimination of hazards, activities and exposures that can negatively affect an organization and its assets.

SearchSecurity
  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

  • cipher

    In cryptography, a cipher is an algorithm for encrypting and decrypting data.

  • What is risk analysis?

    Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing potential issues that could negatively impact key business initiatives ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory)

    MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a method of storing data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical ...

  • storage volume

    A storage volume is an identifiable unit of data storage. It can be a removable hard disk, but it does not have to be a unit that...

Close