Browse Definitions :
Definition

dynamic case management (DCM)

Dynamic case management (DCM) is the handling of case-related work through the use of technologies that automate and streamline aspects of each case. In this context, a case is a collection of information about a particular instance of something, such as a person, company, incident or problem.

DCM — sometimes called “advanced case management” (ACM) -- is a both a human- and a technology-based approach that is driven by incoming events. These events change the context of the information, requiring responses from caseworkers or other knowledge workers. DCM’s ultimate goal is helping such workers make faster, better and more accurate decisions.

DCM is similar to business process management (BPM) in that it works to improve task management and workflow. However, while BPM focuses on the complete definition and control of structured, repeated processes, DCM works on an ad hoc basis to manage dynamic, unstructured processes. In fact, DCM can be especially effective for companies handling “untamed” business processes that lack structure or add no value. It’s also increasingly used to enhance collaboration and improve compliance activities. Initially used primarily in healthcare, insurance and similar industries, DCM is now moving into many other fields as well.

 

Continue reading about dynamic case management (DCM):

 > ebizQ Guide: Use DCM to battle untamed processes

 > Reality check: Debunking myths and misconceptions about DCM

 > Forrester Analyst Jam Session: Dynamic Case Management: An Old Idea Catches New Fire (video)

This was last updated in February 2012
SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • black hat hacker

    A black hat hacker has been historically used to describe one who has malicious intent -- such as theft of information, fraud or ...

  • cookie poisoning

    Cookie poisoning is a type of cyber attack in which a bad actor hijacks, forges, alters or manipulates a cookie to gain ...

  • footprinting

    Footprinting is an ethical hacking technique used to gather as much data as possible about a specific targeted computer system, ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)

    Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) is a technology that enables two networked computers to exchange data in main memory without ...

  • storage (computer storage)

    Data storage is the collective methods and technologies that capture and retain digital information on electromagnetic, optical ...

  • storage medium (storage media)

    In computers, a storage medium is a physical device that receives and retains electronic data for applications and users and ...

Close