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Definition

dynamic hashing

Dynamic hashing is a method of hashing, or shortening a string of characters in computer programming, where the set of shortened characters grows, shrinks, and reorganizes to fit the way the data is being accessed. All objects listed in an object dictionary are dynamic and may change when dynamic hashing is applied.

The process of dynamic hashing creates a smaller, adaptable string of characters, making it faster and easier for users to find objects in a dictionary or groups of objects stored in a containing data structure. Dynamic hashing prevents issues caused by a database growing too large and allows for maximum performance. It addition, it maximizes the available space for objects, tables, and other data within a system.

How dynamic hashing works

A hash function is similar to a find and replace feature where programmers are able to specify a specific item and create a system of rules that change it wherever that item occurs and the specified criteria are met.

In dynamic hashing, only a small amount of data is ever accessed at one time, making it easier on a computer's resources to perform one or more of the following commands:

  • Insert- Adds selected content.
  • Delete- Removes selected content.
  • Update- Changes selected content.
  • Query- Pulls up all results with specified criteria.

Dynamic hashing simplifies the work of searching a large database for a specific piece of information and performing various actions on it.

Advantages of dynamic hashing

Compared to other methods of hashing, dynamic hashing provides the following advantages:

  • Performance is not affected when the amount of data in a system is increased, only the memory size is.
  • Memory never goes unused as it adapts to data size.
  • Well-suited for applications where data is constantly changing.
This was last updated in June 2019

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