Browse Definitions :
Definition

empirical analysis

Empirical analysis is an evidence-based approach to the study and interpretation of information. The empirical approach relies on real-world data, metrics and results rather than theories and concepts.  

Empiricism is the idea that knowledge is primarily received through experience and attained through the five senses. Empiricism contrasts with rationalism, the idea that knowledge is largely attained the through exploration of concepts, deduction, intuition and revelation.

Empirical analysis is integral to the scientific method and is the usual approach used to study subjects for a probable answer through quantified observations of empirical evidence. Empirical analysis never gives an absolute answer, however, only a most likely answer based on probability

In IT, empirical analysis is performed in market research, software development, data analytics and project management. In machine learning, empirical data analysis can be used as a data-driven approach that is free from potentially restrictive strong initial assumptions, unlike other probability-driven models.

Empirical research often begins with a question such as: Does talking on a phone impair driving ability? From this initial question, a hypothesis for research can be proposed: Speaking on a cell phone will impair driving. That hypothesis can then be tested by examining primary data gathered by the researcher for that particular study or existing secondary data that has already been gathered by others. For example, empirical data might be gathered from correlating police records or speaking to a representative of the police department as primary research or from examining previously compiled studies as secondary research. From the gathered data, it can be decided if the hypothesis is supported or not and work towards the conclusion.

The term empiricism comes from the Greek word for experience: empeiria.

This was last updated in August 2017

Continue Reading About empirical analysis

SearchCompliance
  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity
  • computer forensics (cyber forensics)

    Computer forensics is the application of investigation and analysis techniques to gather and preserve evidence from a particular ...

  • multifactor authentication (MFA)

    Multifactor authentication (MFA) is a security technology that requires more than one method of authentication from independent ...

  • insider threat

    An insider threat is a category of risk posed by those who have access to an organization's physical or digital assets.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage
  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close