Browse Definitions :
Definition

empirical analysis

Empirical analysis is an evidence-based approach to the study and interpretation of information. The empirical approach relies on real-world data, metrics and results rather than theories and concepts.  

empiricism is the idea that knowledge is primarily received through experience and attained through the five senses. Empiricism contrasts with rationalism, the idea that knowledge is largely attained the through exploration of concepts, deduction, intuition and revelation.

Empirical analysis is integral to the scientific method and is the usual approach used to study subjects for a probable answer through quantified observations of empirical evidence. Empirical analysis never gives an absolute answer, however, only a most likely answer based on probability

In IT, empirical analysis is performed in market research, software development, data analytics and project management. In machine learning, empirical data analysis can be used as a data-driven approach that is free from potentially restrictive strong initial assumptions, unlike other probability-driven models.

Empirical research often begins with a question such as: Does talking on a phone impair driving ability? From this initial question, a hypothesis for research can be proposed: Speaking on a cell phone will impair driving. That hypothesis can then be tested by examining primary data gathered by the researcher for that particular study or existing secondary data that has already been gathered by others. For example, empirical data might be gathered from correlating police records or speaking to a representative of the police department as primary research or from examining previously compiled studies as secondary research. From the gathered data, it can be decided if the hypothesis is supported or not and work towards the conclusion.

The term empiricism comes from the Greek word for experience: empeiria.

This was last updated in August 2017

Continue Reading About empirical analysis

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk avoidance

    Risk avoidance is the elimination of hazards, activities and exposures that can negatively affect an organization and its assets.

SearchSecurity
  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

  • cipher

    In cryptography, a cipher is an algorithm for encrypting and decrypting data.

  • What is risk analysis?

    Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing potential issues that could negatively impact key business initiatives ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory)

    MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a method of storing data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical ...

  • storage volume

    A storage volume is an identifiable unit of data storage. It can be a removable hard disk, but it does not have to be a unit that...

Close