Browse Definitions :
Definition

expanded memory

Expanded memory, also know as EMS (Expanded Memory Specification) was a method used to increase the 640KB upper limit of MS-DOS to 1MB using a gated memory riser card.

After the advent of extended memory, programs written to use EMS would be redirected by driver emulation to use extended memory instead, which did not rely upon special hardware but just increasing RAM capacities. Extended memory can only be addressed by software running in protected mode as all but the small portion of high memory are unreadable by programs running in standard real mode.

Expanded memory is a distinct technology from the similarly named extended memory, which replaced EMS with greater capacity when it was introduced with the Intel 80286.

Fun fact: The 640KB upper limit of DOS is the alleged source of the often-quoted but steadfastly denied Bill Gates statement: “640KB ought to be enough for anyone.”

This was last updated in February 2014
SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • What is cybersecurity?

    Cybersecurity is the protection of internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

  • private key

    A private key, also known as a secret key, is a variable in cryptography that is used with an algorithm to encrypt and decrypt ...

  • DOS (disk operating system)

    A DOS, or disk operating system, is an operating system that runs from a disk drive. The term can also refer to a particular ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • RAID 6

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • NOR flash memory

    NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.

Close