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Definition

fan-out

Fan-out is a term that defines the maximum number of digital inputs that the output of a single logic gate can feed. Most transistor-transistor logic ( TTL ) gates can feed up to 10 other digital gates or devices. Thus, a typical TTL gate has a fan-out of 10.

In some digital systems, it is necessary for a single TTL logic gate to drive more than 10 other gates or devices. When this is the case, a device called a buffer can be used between the TTL gate and the multiple devices it must drive. A buffer of this type has a fan-out of 25 to 30. A logical inverter (also called a NOT gate) can serve this function in most digital circuits.

Compare fan-in .

This was last updated in September 2005
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