Browse Definitions :
Definition

fast data

Fast data is the application of big data analytics to smaller data sets in near-real or real-time in order to solve a problem or create business value.

The goal of fast data is to quickly gather and mine structured and unstructured data so that action can be taken. As the flood of data from sensors, actuators and machine-to-machine (M2M) communication in the Internet of Things (IoT) continues to grow, it has become more important than ever for organizations to identify what data is time-sensitive and should be acted upon right away and what data can sit in a database or data lake until there is a reason to mine it.

The term fast data is often associated with self-service BI and in-memory databases.  The concept plays an important role in native cloud applications that require low latency and depend upon the high I/O capability that all-flash or hybrid flash storage arrays provide.

In the future, it is expected that some fast data applications will rely on rapid batch data while others will require real-time streams. Potential use cases for fast data include:

  • Smart grid applications that can analyze real-time electric power usage at tens-of-thousands of locations and automatically initiate load shedding to balance supply with demand in specific geographical areas.     
  • Smart window display applications that can identify a potential customer’s demographic profile and generate a discount code or other special offer for him when he enters the store.
  • Smart surveillance cameras that can continuously record events and use predictive analytics to identify and flag security anomalies as they occur.
This was last updated in April 2016

Continue Reading About fast data

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • What is cybersecurity?

    Cybersecurity is the protection of internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

  • private key

    A private key, also known as a secret key, is a variable in cryptography that is used with an algorithm to encrypt and decrypt ...

  • DOS (disk operating system)

    A DOS, or disk operating system, is an operating system that runs from a disk drive. The term can also refer to a particular ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • RAID 6

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • NOR flash memory

    NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.

Close