Browse Definitions :
Definition

gold plating

Gold plating is the practice of making changes to a project that are outside of the original agreed-upon scope.

Gold plating takes time. The practice is very similar to feature creep, which involves enhancements tacked onto a project at the request of the client. In the case of gold plating, though, developers may add polish or features that weren’t asked for, with the intention of adding value and impressing the client.

Gold plating is generally seen as a poor practice. Despite best intentions, the added work is often risky. Gold plating may take longer than anticipated, pushing a project past its due date. The additional changes can even have a negative effect on the existing functionality. However, even if it works out as intended, a client may not need or even like the added efforts.  In addition to its other drawbacks, gold plating can also make it impossible to sell the client additional features after the agreed-upon scope has been met.

Developers sometimes make the mistake of gold plating trying to impress important clients -- particularly if the developers or project managers are less experienced. Although gold plating is often seen as a flaw in project management, it may be carried out by the employees without knowledge of the project manager as a secretive “skunkworks” side-project.

In light of the risk-reward ratio, gold plating is typically not worthy of the invested time.

This was last updated in February 2016

Continue Reading About gold plating

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • chief risk officer (CRO)

    The chief risk officer (CRO) is the corporate executive tasked with assessing and mitigating significant competitive, regulatory ...

SearchSecurity
  • encryption key

    In cryptography, an encryption key is a variable value that is applied using an algorithm to a string or block of unencrypted ...

  • payload (computing)

    In computing, a payload is the carrying capacity of a packet or other transmission data unit.

  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
Close