Browse Definitions :
Definition

graphene transistor

A graphene transistor is a nanoscale device based on graphene, a component of graphite with electronic properties far superior to those of silicon. The device is a single-electron transistor, which means that a single electron passes through it at any one time.

A research team led by Professor Andre Geim of the Manchester Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology built a graphene transistor and described it in the March 2007 issue of Nature magazine.

Features of the graphene transistor include:

  • the ability to operate at room temperature.
  • a size one atom by 10 atoms wide.
  • extreme sensitivity.
  • the ability to operate with the application of very low voltages.

These qualities mean that graphene-based processors could be a fast, low-power successor to silicon-based processors and enable advances in microchip technology beyond the capabilities of those using silicon as their semiconductor material. Electrons can move through graphene at speeds ten to one thousand times greater than silicon. Furthermore, unlike silicon, graphene's properties actually improve as the devices become smaller. That capacity, coupled with the ability to operate at room temperature, could allow more miniaturization which would, in turn, allow more components to be placed on an integrated circuit (IC).

Scientists have predicted that graphene transistors could scale to transistor channels as small as two nanometers (nm) with terahertz speeds.

Learn More About IT:
> Science Daily reported that 'New Graphene Transistor Promises Life After Death Of Silicon Chip.'
> Photonics.com describes the graphene transistor.

This was last updated in July 2008
SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • shadow password file

    A shadow password file, also known as /etc/shadow, is a system file in Linux that stores encrypted user passwords and is ...

  • browser hijacker (browser hijacking)

    A browser hijacker is a malware program that modifies web browser settings without the user's permission and redirects the user ...

  • Kerberos

    Kerberos is a protocol for authenticating service requests between trusted hosts across an untrusted network, such as the ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • bare-metal restore

    A bare-metal restore (also referred to as bare-metal recovery or bare-metal backup) is a data recovery and restoration process ...

  • mSATA SSD (mSATA solid-state drive)

    An mSATA SSD is a solid-state drive (SSD) that conforms to the mSATA interface specification developed by the Serial ATA (SATA) ...

  • network-attached storage (NAS)

    Network-attached storage (NAS) is dedicated file storage that enables multiple users and heterogeneous client devices to retrieve...

Close