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Definition

green procurement

Green procurement is the adoption of ecologically responsible practices in business activities used to meet needs for materials, goods, utilities and services. The approach is one component of sustainable procurement, along with a dedication to social responsibility and good corporate citizenship.

Companies sometimes make an individual purchasing decision with an eye to its ecological impact, realizing the positive public relations benefits that action may bring. Green procurement, however, is a continuous commitment to start-to-finish process management with consideration for environmental impact.

The product lifecycle and its ecologic impact through production, operation, maintenance and disposal are all considered in green procurement. Similarly to choices in products, service providers are chosen with ecological considerations in mind, including a commitment to the use of less harmful or environmentally friendly products and practices to provide their services.

Green procurement and the related supply chain sustainability require coordination and collaboration with internal and external supply chain partners to reexamine delivery methods, products, packaging and measurement systems.

See also: greenwashing, product footprint

This was last updated in June 2016

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