Browse Definitions :
Definition

ikigai

Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore

Ikigai is a Japanese word whose meaning translates roughly to a reason for being, encompassing joy, a sense of purpose and meaning and a feeling of well-being.

The word derives from iki, meaning life and kai, meaning the realisation of hopes and expectations. In business, the incorporation of the elements of ikigai to an employee's position is thought to yield the highest levels of employee engagement and productivity while also fostering job satisfaction and loyalty to the organization.

In his book Taking Flight, Anthony de Mello wrote about finding ikigai through examining your responses to four questions:

What do you love?

What are you good at?

What can you be paid for?

What does the world need?

According to de Mello, finding where those components interlap yields ikigai. (Definition continues below the diagram.)

  Ikigai-EN-optimized-PNG

Such processes of inquiry may be applied by an entrepreneur to determine the kind of startup that will be most satisfying for them. In the workplace, ikigai may seem like an unrealistic ideal. However, those questions can be adopted to guide employee management. It's entirely practical, for example, to ensure that employees are in the positions in an organization for which they are best suited. Likewise, it's a good practice to find out what employees truly care about and discover ways that they can make meaningful contributions.

This was last updated in April 2016

Continue Reading About ikigai

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • brute force attack

    Brute force (also known as brute force cracking) is a trial and error method used by application programs to decode encrypted ...

  • spyware

    Spyware is software that is installed on a computing device without the user's knowledge. Spyware can be difficult to detect; ...

  • ATM black box attack

    An ATM black box attack, also referred to as jackpotting, is a type of banking-system crime in which the perpetrators bore holes ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

  • disaster recovery (DR) test

    A disaster recovery test (DR test) is the examination of each step in a disaster recovery plan as outlined in an organization's ...

SearchStorage

  • disk array

    A disk array, also called a storage array, is a data storage system used for block-based storage, file-based storage or object ...

  • enterprise storage

    Enterprise storage is a centralized repository for business information that provides common data management, protection and data...

  • optical storage

    Optical storage is any storage type in which data is written and read with a laser. Typically, data is written to optical media, ...

Close