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Definition

image compression

Image compression is minimizing the size in bytes of a graphics file without degrading the quality of the image to an unacceptable level. The reduction in file size allows more images to be stored in a given amount of disk or memory space. It also reduces the time required for images to be sent over the Internet or downloaded from Web pages.

There are several different ways in which image files can be compressed. For Internet use, the two most common compressed graphic image formats are the JPEG format and the GIF format. The JPEG method is more often used for photographs, while the GIF method is commonly used for line art and other images in which geometric shapes are relatively simple.

Other techniques for image compression include the use of fractals and wavelets. These methods have not gained widespread acceptance for use on the Internet as of this writing. However, both methods offer promise because they offer higher compression ratios than the JPEG or GIF methods for some types of images. Another new method that may in time replace the GIF format is the PNG format.

A text file or program can be compressed without the introduction of errors, but only up to a certain extent. This is called lossless compression. Beyond this point, errors are introduced. In text and program files, it is crucial that compression be lossless because a single error can seriously damage the meaning of a text file, or cause a program not to run. In image compression, a small loss in quality is usually not noticeable. There is no "critical point" up to which compression works perfectly, but beyond which it becomes impossible. When there is some tolerance for loss, the compression factor can be greater than it can when there is no loss tolerance. For this reason, graphic images can be compressed more than text files or programs.

This was last updated in April 2005
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