Browse Definitions :
Definition

in-memory data grid

An in-memory data grid (IMDG) is a data structure that resides entirely in RAM (random access memory), and is distributed among multiple servers. Recent advances in 64-bit and multi-core systems have made it practical to store terabytes of data completely in RAM, obviating the need for electromechanical mass storage media such as hard disks.

According to industry analyst firm Gartner Inc., IMDGs are suited to handle big data's "big-three V's": velocity, variability, and volume. IMDGs can support hundreds of thousands of in-memory data updates per second, and they can be clustered and scaled in ways that support large quantities of data. Specific advantages of IMDG technology include:

  • Enhanced performance because data can be written to, and read from, memory much faster than is possible with a hard disk.
  • The data grid can be easily scaled, and upgrades can be easily implemented.
  • A key/value data structure, rather than a relational structure, provides flexibility for application developers.
  • The technical advantages provide business benefits in the form of faster decision making, greater productivity, and improved customer service.

Applications that can benefit from IMDG include financial-instrument pricing in banks, shopping carts in e-commerce, user-preference calculations in Web applications, reservation systems in the travel industry, and cloud applications.

This was last updated in March 2013

Continue Reading About in-memory data grid

SearchCompliance

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

SearchSecurity

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close