Browse Definitions :
Definition

inertia

Inertia is a property of matter that causes it to resist changes in velocity (speed and/or direction). According to Newton's first law of motion, an object with a given velocity maintains that velocity unless acted on by an external force. Inertia is the property of matter that makes this law hold true.

The amount of inertia that an object possesses is proportional to its mass . However, inertia is not the same thing as mass or momentum (the product of velocity and mass). The mass of an object can be measured by observing the extent of its inertia. This is done by measuring the amount of force required to produce a certain acceleration .

The property of inertia is useful in navigation systems. A massive object can provide a constant reference for acceleration, and in particular, changes in direction, because it tends to maintain a constant orientation in space. Inertial guidance systems are used in aircraft, spacecraft, oceangoing vessels, and missiles.

This was last updated in September 2005

Join the conversation

2 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

I'm trying to define a condition where inertia is nullified, shielded, or rendered non-existent. Brain experiment: a 10 lb. weight has it's inertia rendered non-existent while not changing (shielding, nullifying) any other characteristic, what would be the effect of a very small explosion on the surface of the weight? Movement? Nothing? If a change, describe it.
Cancel
Inertia is an interaction with Time.

Inertia of an object (even 2d fields) has 3 stages.

1) When an object is accelerated, until it is reaching a steady-constant velocity, its inertia resist to motion.
2) When an object reaches a constant velocity, its inertia preserved as momentum.
3) When an object
is tried to be stopped, its inertia resist to keep movement.

All of that are using the same mechanism.

At first, the motion is energizing a system. The used energy for motion is keeping in the System. But where?
Of course, as an identical for all objects, at their the basic-smallest parts of them. If we think that all matter and also fields are composed from energy, in the energy packs or quanta of any object.
(We may define this vibrating quanta also as strings.)
With Quanta, I mean the smallest energy package which can be determined and let exist the energy as a photon also.

In the universe, everything has a vibration. For example, the energy fields, photons or sub particles of any matter and matter.

In fact, although the energy of a vibrating object or system depend on frequency and wavelength, if we try to load more energy without changing them or with a less change, the amplitude of this vibration increases.

This means, I think, all energy used for motion is preserved in the vibration amplitudes of quantas of matter.

This vibration, when the object is motionless or under constant velocity, is balanced. The pressure between center and the vibration fields are equal. This balanced situation is changing while the system is accelerating or decelerating.
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

Extensions de fichiers et formats de fichiers

Motorisé par:

SearchCompliance

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

  • compliance as a service (CaaS)

    Compliance as a Service (CaaS) is a cloud service service level agreement (SLA) that specified how a managed service provider (...

  • data protection impact assessment (DPIA)

    A data protection impact assessment (DPIA) is a process designed to help organizations determine how data processing systems, ...

SearchSecurity

  • NIST Cybersecurity Framework

    The NIST Cybersecurity Framework (NIST CSF) is a policy framework surrounding IT infrastructure security.

  • Port Scan

    A port scan is a series of messages sent by someone attempting to break into a computer to learn which computer network services ...

  • DMZ (networking)

    In computer networks, a DMZ (demilitarized zone), also sometimes known as a perimeter network or a screened subnetwork, is a ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity plan (BCP)

    A business continuity plan (BCP) is a document that consists of the critical information an organization needs to continue ...

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

SearchStorage

Close