Browse Definitions :
Definition

integer

An integer (pronounced IN-tuh-jer) is a whole number (not a fractional number) that can be positive, negative, or zero.

Examples of integers are: -5, 1, 5, 8, 97, and 3,043.

Examples of numbers that are not integers are: -1.43, 1 3/4, 3.14, .09, and 5,643.1.

The set of integers, denoted Z, is formally defined as follows:

Z = {..., -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...}

In mathematical equations, unknown or unspecified integers are represented by lowercase, italicized letters from the "late middle" of the alphabet. The most common are p, q, r, and s.

The set Z is a denumerable set. Denumerability refers to the fact that, even though there might be an infinite number of elements in a set, those elements can be denoted by a list that implies the identity of every element in the set. For example, it is intuitive from the list {..., -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...} that 356,804,251 and -67,332 are integers, but 356,804,251.5, -67,332.89, -4/3, and 0.232323 ... are not.

The elements of Z can be paired off one-to-one with the elements of N, the set of natural numbers, with no elements being left out of either set. Let N = {1, 2, 3, ...}. Then the pairing can proceed in this way:

integer.gif (1078 bytes)

In infinite sets, the existence of a one-to-one correspondence is the litmus test for determining cardinality, or size. The set of natural numbers and the set of rational numbers have the same cardinality as Z. However, the sets of real numbers, imaginary numbers, and complex numbers have cardinality larger than that of Z.

See an integer rap battle:

This was last updated in May 2015

Continue Reading About integer

Join the conversation

1 comment

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

what a terrible rap battle imo
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • reverse brute-force attack

    A reverse brute-force attack is a type of brute-force attack in which an attacker uses a common password against multiple ...

  • orphan account

    An orphan account, also referred to as an orphaned account, is a user account that can provide access to corporate systems, ...

  • voice squatting (skill squatting)

    Voice squatting is an attack vector for voice user interfaces (VUIs) that exploits homonyms (words that sound the same but are ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity policy

    Business continuity policy is the set of standards and guidelines an organization enforces to ensure resilience and proper risk ...

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

SearchStorage

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access ...

  • disk array

    A disk array, also called a storage array, is a data storage system used for block-based storage, file-based storage or object ...

  • enterprise storage

    Enterprise storage is a centralized repository for business information that provides common data management, protection and data...

Close